Thomas Fletcher (fletch31526) wrote,
Thomas Fletcher
fletch31526

  • Music:

WNL-XI: "...Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door"

I give my parents credit for my love of music... and for my twisted tastes of it. You guys have already seen the influence of my dad's Alabama albums and my mom's Statler Brothers records. But I was also heavily influenced by the moody sounds of the 1960s and early 1970s. My mom graduated high school in 1969 and much of the vinyl that she kept from that era saw heavy rotation in the make-believe radio station I operated from my bedroom as a kid.

At 30, I'm glad I have an appreciation for that era of music, even though it put me at a slight social disadvantage growing up. When you're 11 in 1989 -- before being musically eclectic was cool again -- few people want to talk about Bobby Goldsboro or the Beatles or the Righteous Brothers. Hell, few kids knew who those folks were.

When I think back to sitting in the floor in front of the record player and exploring music from before I was born, I wonder if my kids will ever have similar musical experiences. The records I played from my parents youth told stories with their vinyl and cardboard. You could see and hear their age. The couple of hundred CDs I have are nothing like that and the thousands of MP3s I own are even less so. Will my kids want to curl up in the computer room and listen to old MP3s? Somehow, that seems to be missing some of the romance.

Two of the pieces of vinyl most played by me as a kid were probably the two records from The Beatles' "Red Album" -- 1962-1966. To be honest, I was probably drawn in by the photographs on the outside of the album. On the front are the four very clean-cut Beatles from 1962. The back photo was taken some seven years later and they're well entrenched in their long-haired hippie look including John Lennon complete with round glasses and beard. As a kid so young, the fact that people could change so much in such a short time fascinated me. Maybe it still does today.

It's probably the Red Album's fault that the early Beatles stuff is among my favorites from the bad. Several of those songs saw a lot of play at my hands including Nowhere Man, Yesterday, Paperback Writer, In My Life and this week's WNL... Eleanor Rigby. 

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window, wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near.
Look at him working. Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Eleanor Rigby
John Lennon, Paul McCartney

July 1968, St. Pacras Churchyard

Tags: lyrics, photo, public, wnl
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